ascorbic acid

rpn

i recently bought some KAF ascorbic acid with intent to "feed" the yeast for extra rise but don't know how much to use. what are ratios of ascorbic acid, yeast and flour for straight yeast bread? how about sourdough starter ratios?

badge posted by: rpn on October 26, 2010 at 12:42 am in Q & A
share on: Twitter, Facebook
Replies to this discussion
Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save" to activate your changes.
reply by: kidpizza on October 26, 2010 at 2:24 pm
kidpizza

RPN:
Good day to you. I have read your posting with much interest.
As you know this product is a form of vitamin C. KAF flour along with Pillsbury, & Gold medal flour have this ingredient mixed in at the mill & it disapates in the baking proceess. You do not need to increase it. In any event just add a few shakes of this acid in with the yeast till you use it up. I will now give you my secret trick....when you finish you acid that you just bought, just use a few shakes of ground ginger this is yeast food...this is what I use... IT WORKS!!!.

I will not answer your question about sourdough bread. As I have no expertise in this area, only baking science of it. But you see the use of this ingredient is to strengthen the gluten. It helps If the fermentation time is limited in time. Sourdough may have enough time to ferment & it does seem to do that very slowly. However, If you employ granular yeast along with your natural yeast dough then you can employ it as an option.
This Is all I have for you today. good luck & enjoy the rest of the day.

~KIDPIZZA.

reply by: lindyd on October 26, 2010 at 3:01 pm
lindyd

Hi RPN,

Per Baking911, it "creates an acidic environment for the yeast which helps it work better. It also acts as a preservative & deters mold and bacterial growth. With just a touch of ascorbic acid, your Artisan breads, the yeast will work longer and faster. French bakers add it to their French bread, baguette or boule recipe."

http://www.baking911.com/bread/101_ingredients_doughenhancers.htm

Use 1/8th teaspoon per recipe.

reply by: rpn on October 26, 2010 at 3:46 pm
rpn

Thank you for the kind response. Altho i asked for how to use it, your reply about how it works is very useful. if i learn anything about interaction of AA with sourdough i will post it here to share as you so kindly did. Also will use ginger as suggested but have some concern about the added taste. Not an exact science, it is. R

reply by: rpn on October 26, 2010 at 3:49 pm
rpn

Thank you for your kind, informative and very useful reply. A 1/8th tsp it is, then -- thank you. My baguette eaters will appreciate! R

reply by: Naughtysquirrel on October 26, 2010 at 4:23 pm
Naughtysquirrel

lindyd - thanx for that link - it was very informative....NS