Can you freeze buttermilk?

cmcjames

I inevitably purchase more buttermilk than I need for a recipe. I don't use it very often, but I have particular recipes I need it for. Is it possible to freeze buttermilk, or keep it from going bad some other way? I hate to pour it down the drain.

badge posted by: cmcjames on October 13, 2010 at 12:57 pm in General discussions
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reply by: swirth on October 13, 2010 at 1:05 pm
swirth

Hello...yes, you can freeze buttermilk to save from wasting it. It won't be quite as nice and some of the cultures will be gone, but if you shake it up well before using it next time, it will be OK.

reply by: beabaker on October 13, 2010 at 1:25 pm
beabaker

I use dry buttermilk with all my recipes. You can buy it at the market near the canned milks - you add the dry by tablespoon to your recipe with dry ingredients and then add water with the wet. Works beautifully, no waste and no one will know the difference.

reply by: franciepad on October 13, 2010 at 1:35 pm
franciepad

I searched and found this to answer your question.

Liquid Buttermilk
There are two types of commercial buttermilk, cultured and acidified. Cultured buttermilk is made by using a lactose-producing bacterial strain that thickens the milk while the acidified version is made by adding tartaric or citric acid to milk. The acid thicken the milk and produces a sour flavor.

Buttermilk Powder
The buttermilk is first pasteurized, then concentrated with an evaporator and finally dried (spray or roller dried) to produce buttermilk powder. Buttermilk powder is low in fat and provides an excellent source of protein. It is also a source of calcium, phosphorous, riboflavin and vitamin B12. (Milkingredients.ca)
Tips For Storing or Using Left Over Buttermilk
Refrigerate - Buttermilk stores for weeks after the expiration date and works very well for recipes that call for buttermilk.

Freezing - Place buttermilk in 1/2 to 1 cup freezer containers. Thaw in the refrigerator. The thawed milk is appropriate for cooking but probably not for drinking.

I've kept buttermilk in the fridge for quite some time. You've got to shake it up before you use it. If the liquid separates and there are chunks in the buttermilk, I wouldn't use it. Otherwise it's fine.

reply by: Christian T on October 13, 2010 at 2:23 pm
Christian T

Waffles, pancakes biscuits and cookies. Lots of uses before it goes bad in a month or two. I used to use the dry stuff which is fine. But, real buttermilk lasts for a long, long time. AND, if it goes bad after a couple uses, it's really not very expensive to run down the sink.

reply by: Mike Nolan on October 13, 2010 at 3:51 pm
Mike Nolan

I can go months without making anything that uses buttermilk and then make 3-4 things that use it in a few weeks.

I find that buttermilk is usually good for at least a month after the 'use by' date, though recently I tossed some buttermilk that had been in my fridge a WHOLE LOT longer than that, hidden in the back.

A few months more and it might have thrown itself out!

reply by: annzie on October 13, 2010 at 5:33 pm
annzie

Using buttermilk: I just posted a recipe that I think came from PJH a number of years ago, but I couldn't find it in King Arthur's recipes. It is called "Homemade Whole Grain Pancake Mix". It makes quick, healthy, delicious pancakes. The mix itself is dry, but when you make it up, you use 1 c. mix, 1 c. buttermilk and 1 egg. The mix mix keeps indefinitely in the 'frig, and has become one of our favorites.

reply by: cmcjames on October 14, 2010 at 6:26 pm
cmcjames

Thanks to everyone for the information. Now I am very knowledgable about buttermilk!

reply by: cmcjames on October 14, 2010 at 6:27 pm
cmcjames

Thanks, I'll look for the recipe. It sounds good.

reply by: repmogirl on October 14, 2010 at 7:13 pm
repmogirl

Someone on a food board that I used to frequent told me that buttermilk was ok to use as long as it wasn't moldy, no matter how old it was. I have gone by that philosophy for several years. It has worked out just fine for me

reply by: elisabethberthasavage on October 15, 2010 at 10:22 am
elisabethberthasavage

Having worked in bakeries, we would freeze cartons of buttermilk all the time. Because we would order it by the case, we had no choice but freeze. Just thaw and give it a good shake. As a home baker, I love my buttermilk powder for the convenience! Elisabeth

reply by: elisabethberthasavage on October 15, 2010 at 12:08 pm
elisabethberthasavage

Having worked in bakeries, we would freeze cartons of buttermilk all the time. Because we would order it by the case, we had no choice but freeze. Just thaw and give it a good shake. As a home baker, I love my buttermilk powder for the convenience! Elisabeth

reply by: moxieme63 on October 18, 2010 at 12:59 am
moxieme63

I'm glad you asked the question as I've always wondered myself. Certainly I didn't know you could use it way past the expiration date...I'll have to check that out!

reply by: keenecowboy on October 18, 2010 at 9:38 pm
keenecowboy

Make your own as you need it.

•Milk (just under one cup)
•1 Tablespoon white vinegar or lemon juice