Substitute for honey in bread recipe?

jennywigg

I'm baking bread using my favorite recipe (loaf bread made with yeast), but for the first time ever, I'm out of honey the day I need it! What can I use to substitute? I've made bread with molasses but didn't really care for the end result. Thanks!

badge posted by: jennywigg on May 31, 2011 at 3:07 pm in Baking, yeast
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reply by: rricord on May 31, 2011 at 4:12 pm
rricord

Maybe Lyle's golden syrup would work. It's very sweet and has the same consistency.

reply by: hickeyja on May 31, 2011 at 4:28 pm
hickeyja

Maple syrup can be substituted 1:1 for honey. You can also substitute white or brown sugar by WEIGHT, not volume. Jan

reply by: pjh on May 31, 2011 at 5:04 pm
pjh

People seem to love to hate corn syrup these days, but you can certainly use that - or agave syrup, or really any kind of thick liquid sweetener...

reply by: L. M. Newton on May 31, 2011 at 5:13 pm
L. M. Newton

I'm watching the other replies thinking, "please, please don't use corn syrup"! LOL!

Yup, you can count me as one of those nut jobs who love to hate corn syrup!

reply by: sandra Alicante on May 31, 2011 at 5:20 pm
sandra Alicante

Yes, I can't stand the taste of honey and if a recipe calls for it, Golden Syrup is what I use instead. It really only imparts a sweetness, not flavour, unless you are using loads of it!

reply by: sandra Alicante on May 31, 2011 at 5:23 pm
sandra Alicante

You could use malt syrup if you have that, or golden syrup, in equal amounts to the honey you would use. If it is only a tbspn, I have been known just to throw in a tbsp of sugar instead without any problems. You can always add a drop more water if necessary for liquid.

sandrascookbook.com

reply by: Mike Nolan on May 31, 2011 at 5:26 pm
Mike Nolan

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Cooking Substitutions says you can also use 1 cup of granulated sugar or light brown sugar and 1/4 cup of liquid, presumably to replace 1 cup of honey. Stir well to dissolve.

I agree with you that molasses is a bit strong to use as a substitute for honey, and IMHO barley malt syrup is also too strong.

reply by: rricord on May 31, 2011 at 9:14 pm
rricord

ditto that!

reply by: KitchenBarbarian aka Zen on June 01, 2011 at 6:21 pm
KitchenBarbarian aka Zen

Where did the whole "hating corn syrup" thing come from anyway?

I've baked with it for years and years and YEARS and years and eons and years and years, and no one I know can tell the difference, including people who profess to "hate" it.

Most especially including my son, who loves the fudge I make that is largely sweetened by corn syrup. In fact I had no idea people were supposed to hate it until recently.

reply by: Mike Nolan on June 01, 2011 at 10:09 pm
Mike Nolan

It's called FUD--Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. And the louder you shout, the truer it must be. :sigh:

Part of it is probably concerns over GMO cprn, and part of it is over HFCS, though as I understand it the corn syrup you can buy is not HFCS.

reply by: sandra Alicante on June 02, 2011 at 2:21 am
sandra Alicante

I assume that people avoiding corn syrup (for whatever reason) must have a hard time of it if they eat any commercially prepared foods! Don't know about you but I get fed up (pardon the pun) of almost daily articles in the press about what we should or should not eat. Especially as usually a few days later, there is another one that says the opposite!

sandrascookbook.com

reply by: KitchenBarbarian aka Zen on June 02, 2011 at 8:21 am
KitchenBarbarian aka Zen

Apparently the whole controversy is based on the fear (without foundation) that high fructose corn syrup MIGHT be bad for you - if you eat it in high quantities.

So don't eat it in high quantities! LOL!

The easiest way to avoid it is not to drink pop.

For that matter, to much "regular" sugar isn't a good thing either.

Did you see where the FDA is considering taking TABLE SALT off the list of things generally considered to be safe? GEEZ!

reply by: MangoChutney - Sandra Too on June 02, 2011 at 8:21 am
MangoChutney - Sandra Too

The most extreme version of this avoidance that I have seen was a list of possible corn products on someone's website. They included white vinegar on the list because acetic acid is made by oxidation of ethanol, which can be made by fermenting corn. Never mind that white vinegar is a distilled product, made from another distilled product. Most cooks complain that white vinegar is a chemical solution with no nuances of flavor. It's not as if molecules of acetic acid and water can mutate.

reply by: MangoChutney - Sandra Too on June 02, 2011 at 8:36 am
MangoChutney - Sandra Too

I have been watching the whole NYC salt-limiting thing very carefully. I find it difficult to believe that anyone in a cosmopolitan city would seriously consider a ban which would at one stroke eliminate both soy sauce and corned beef, to pick just two very salty ethnic food components.

reply by: KitchenBarbarian aka Zen on June 02, 2011 at 2:57 pm
KitchenBarbarian aka Zen

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

*whimpering in corner*

Seriously salt is a necessary substance. Sure we probably don't need it in the amounts it's added to canned foods - but the solution to that is (1) get companies to reduce the amount of salt they use (not eliminate!) or (2) don't eat so much canned food.

I can't imagine life without soy sauce, ham, or corned beef. Of course I don't eat any of those EVERY DAY, but I like 'em once in awhile!

People die if they don't get enough salt. Granted that's not generally a problem in the US these days. Salt trade was responsible for most of the earliest trade routes. That's why "worth his(her) salt" was high praise.

reply by: Mike Nolan on June 02, 2011 at 4:51 pm
Mike Nolan

They could start by getting restaurants to use less salt, which in turn could start by culinary schools teaching chefs to use less salt.

The CIA is know in some quarters as the Sodium Institute of America because their motto seems to be "When in doubt, add more salt." I've pretty much stopped using Alton Brown recipes without revising them, because he salts very heavily.

Some of us are old enough to remember when goiters were a commonplace ailment in the USA. However, I know several recently trained doctors who never saw one during their entire medical training.

I've also seen at least one recent medical source worry about whether we could see a resurgence of goiters due to the trend towards iodine-free salts.

reply by: sandra Alicante on June 03, 2011 at 1:47 am
sandra Alicante

There's one section of the economy that would be very happy - the pharmaceutical companies! Already there is a significant proportion of the population in the US with thyroid problems, usually hypo, where not enough thyroxine is produced and many more undiagnosed. They will be flogging salt supplements under a fancy name at high prices.....

In the UK, Fish and Chip shops have been ordered to replace salt shakers with ones with fewer holes - supposedly to curb usage. Idiots didn't bother to think people would just shake for longer.....

sandrascookbook.com

reply by: L. M. Newton on June 03, 2011 at 6:17 pm
L. M. Newton

Zen
"Where did the whole "hating corn syrup" thing come from anyway? I've baked with it for years and years and YEARS and years and eons and years and years, and no one I know can tell the difference, including people who profess to "hate" it. Most especially including my son, who loves the fudge I make that is largely sweetened by corn syrup. In fact I had no idea people were supposed to hate it until recently."

**It's not about the taste of corn syrup at all, it's about choosing whether or not to stock it in the pantry for use as a sweetener. In this case, if I was out of honey, I would not choose corn syrup as a substitute.**

Mike
"It's called FUD--Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt. And the louder you shout, the truer it must be. :sigh: Part of it is probably concerns over GMO cprn, and part of it is over HFCS, though as I understand it the corn syrup you can buy is not HFCS."

**Fear, uncertainty, and doubt? Really? That's a little condescending. Karo, BTW, is corn syrup, HFCS, salt, and vanilla. Salt in corn syrup...who'd have thunk it!**

Sandra
"I assume that people avoiding corn syrup (for whatever reason) must have a hard time of it if they eat any commercially prepared foods!"

***BINGO!! That, folks, is the basis for my particular problem with corn syrup. You can't get away from it unless you are in your own kitchen, controlling exactly what goes into your food. That's why I do all of my own baking, and my interest in bread baking was sparked by a loaf of name-brand bread that refused to go stale or moldy after sitting on the counter for weeks. That's not normal.***

Sandra
"Don't know about you but I get fed up (pardon the pun) of almost daily articles in the press about what we should or should not eat. Especially as usually a few days later, there is another one that says the opposite!"

**I agree, but the amount of sodium and various sugar compounds added to commercially-prepared food is something everyone should be concerned about. It really does pose serious health risks, and the advice to avoid excess sugar and salt in our diets is not going to change a few days from now.**

Zen
"Apparently the whole controversy is based on the fear (without foundation) that high fructose corn syrup MIGHT be bad for you - if you eat it in high quantities. So don't eat it in high quantities! LOL! The easiest way to avoid it is not to drink pop."

***...and a few thousand other things sitting on the supermarket shelf!!***

Zen
"For that matter, to much "regular" sugar isn't a good thing either."

***Agreed!***

Zen
"Did you see where the FDA is considering taking TABLE SALT off the list of things generally considered to be safe? GEEZ!"

***Not going there.... :-)

reply by: KitchenBarbarian aka Zen on June 03, 2011 at 10:11 pm
KitchenBarbarian aka Zen

I'm not sure exactly where you're going with this, but there is absolutely no evidence that corn syrup poses a public health danger in whatever quantity, over and above the normal sort of considerations we should always take into consideration (to whit, moderation in all things, including moderation).

As Mike said, it's FUD. This is why they scared manufacturers into stopping production of Rotenone, and why they tried (but failed) to pull my thyroid medication off the market. (They actually DID pull it off the market, but were forced to put it back after the furor it raised - the FDA even had to issue a special dispensation to thyroid patients to buy the stuff from Canada while the gears ground to get production in the US back up and running - which promptly caused the Canadian prices to triple, and then triple again).

Rotenone is NOT on the list of unacceptable substances not approved for organic use. Nevertheless, because of some FUD spreading, manufacturers stopped making it for garden use. You can still get it for use in ponds, which, oddly, is the LAST use it ought to be put to if any of the doubts about it had any actual basis in fact.

I swear, sometimes it seems like the barbarians are winning . . .

reply by: Mike Nolan on June 03, 2011 at 11:20 pm
Mike Nolan

Yeah, and I remember when colchicine went from about 10 cents a tablet to over $4.00 a tablet, too. The only one benefiting from that FDA decision is the drug manufacturer.

The same thing happened to guaifenesin for a while, too.

It's a nasty little trick the FDA allows: Take a commonplace drug, one that has been around for decades, reformulate it a bit, run a few tests and claim a patent on it, and you can jack the price up for a few years.

Here's hoping the drug companies don't ever 'discover' H2O.

reply by: sandra Alicante on June 04, 2011 at 2:35 am
sandra Alicante

Yup, think I know which med Zen is referring to. I remember reading about it when doing some research on my own health issues. The pharmaceutical companies don't like hormones because they can't be patented, only the way of delivering them can...
Don't know about in the States but the synthetic form of thyroxine is dirt cheap here, not sure if you can get the natural version at all though.
My other pet peeve is doctors who diagnose only by numbers, not how you feel or your symptoms..but that's another story!

sandrascookbook.com

reply by: Mike Nolan on June 04, 2011 at 2:43 pm
Mike Nolan

Many doctors appear to be quite clueless when it comes to food-based allergies.

Far too many doctors don't recognize wheat/gluten allergies for what they are, and even fewer are aware that a significant fraction of the population is allergic to garlic.

I think it is quite possible that restaurants have made this worse over the years by putting garlic in EVERYTHING. When we were in Ottawa two weeks ago, we found a very good Italian restaurant (Vittoria Trattoria, for those interested) that either didn't use garlic in many of their dishes or were able to make them without garlic. My wife was talking to the woman running the seating desk, she commented that her father was from Italy and was continually frustrated by restaurants claiming to do Italian cooking who used garlic in everything, including dishes that you would never see with garlic in them in Italy. When we were in northern Italy in 2006, we had far less trouble finding garlic-free dishes than we have in the USA.

reply by: MangoChutney - Sandra Too on June 04, 2011 at 1:45 pm
MangoChutney - Sandra Too

*confused look* You can't get Rotenone for gardening anymore? I hadn't caught onto that. I stopped gardening for about a decade and only started again last year, when I didn't grow anything that required killing insects (only tomatoes and hot peppers).

Rotenone is used in ponds to kill some of the fish if you have too many, am I remembering correctly? I always thought poisoning was a strange thing for conservation departments to be recommending. A quarter-stick would be less toxic to the environment.